CTV Power Play - Crisis in Long-Term Care

CTV Power Play - Crisis in Long-Term Care

The long-term care crisis is a national problem. We would never tolerate this kind of treatment in our hospitals.

It is time bring long-term care under the Canada Health Act.

Federal funding must be tied to strong national standards that are enforced, good working conditions, proper patient-care ratios and public delivery.

'Be vigilant, respect the rules': Critic slams couples who use loophole to reunite at Peace Arch Park

'Be vigilant, respect the rules': Critic slams couples who use loophole to reunite at Peace Arch Park

NDP health critic Don Davies says the heartfelt reunions raise some concerns, given the couples don’t technically have to self-isolate since the lines for the border are staggered at that crossing.

“Folks in B.C. may remember that one of the epicentres for COVID-19 in the U.S. was Washington state, and we’re seeing some of the transmission patterns in B.C. did come from that state. So you know we’ve done a great job in B.C. so far in following public health guidelines. We got to just keep following them now and it would be a shame if after that sacrifice we got a flare-up of transmission because of loopholes like this,” he tells NEWS 1130.

Loophole in CERB payments could be exploited by scammers, says B.C. MP Davies

Loophole in CERB payments could be exploited by scammers, says B.C. MP Davies

A loophole in the Canadian Emergency Response Benefit that doesn’t prohibit people charging fees to help others get relief funds needs to be closed to prevent scams, an NDP MP says.

Don Davies, who represents Vancouver Kingsway, says 77 seniors at a residence in east Vancouver were approached by an individual offering to register them for the relief funds in exchange for a 10 per cent cut of the money.

MP Don Davies calls for federal ban on CERB fees

MP Don Davies calls for federal ban on CERB fees

VANCOUVER – Yesterday, NDP MP Don Davies sent a letter (see below) to Prime Minister Trudeau calling on the federal government to ban third parties from collecting fees for assistance with Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) applications.

Davies' request comes in response to a scam that has targeted at least 77 seniors in Vancouver, along with reports that tax consultants are charging clients for help with CERB application

Feds’ proposal for national testing framework may invite pushback from provinces, but experts say standards ‘essential’ as economy reopens

Feds’ proposal for national testing framework may invite pushback from provinces, but experts say standards ‘essential’ as economy reopens

Still, NDP health critic Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, B.C.) said he did not see the shift in tone from Mr. Trudeau as “a change of heart,” rather “a recognition of an abdication of duty and failure of the federal government, that they finally have corrected.”

Mr. Davies, who also sits on the House Health Committee, said experts have been reiterating the importance of testing “to get a handle on COVID-19, and begin to manage the restoration of an open economy and society” for months now. He said there is a need for a “comprehensive and extensive testing program, but we have anything but that in Canada, and I can’t find out why.”

At least 77 Vancouver seniors targeted in CERB application scheme

At least 77 Vancouver seniors targeted in CERB application scheme

“To me that is fraud. It is counselling someone to commit a fraud and I believe that this is illegal and the police should be involved in this,” said Davies.

Elmore says the Vancouver Police Department is aware of the situation, and is looking into it.

Davies is planning to take the matter to Ottawa to try make it illegal to charge people fees to obtain COVID-19 benefits like the CERB.

"Because if there isn't a clear prohibition against charging people to access this benefit, there ought to be. And I think we should call for that immediately."

CERB scam targeting seniors

CERB scam targeting seniors

“At best this is immoral, at worst illegal. We need to put an immediate stop to this scam that takes advantage of seniors,” Davies says.

This week, the federal government announced there will be subsequent measures made to identify fraud cases.

For Canadians who shouldn’t have received money, but did, a new repayment option on the Canada Revenue Agency website is now available to repay it back.

Pressure mounts on federal government to help fix, build long-term care homes as pandemic takes deadly toll

Pressure mounts on federal government to help fix, build long-term care homes as pandemic takes deadly toll

NDP health critic Don Davies said the federal government has a responsibility to address the "disgraceful" state of long term care in Canada.

"Too many governments have ignored this important area of care for too long. We need to work at all levels to comprehensively address the deficiencies," he said.

Davies said the federal government could help fund nursing homes by creating a dedicated federal transfer to the provinces and territories, while requiring that the funds be used for long-term care.

 Canadian MPs’ effort to summon WHO adviser comes under fire in China

Canadian MPs’ effort to summon WHO adviser comes under fire in China

NDP health critic Don Davies, a member of the committee, said his interest in Dr. Aylward testifying has nothing to do with China or geopolitical issues. “From the outset, the Canadian government and public health agency relied explicitly on WHO guidance and information. They continue to do so. I would like to explore the basis of these,” he said.

“Second, the WHO also has members who are at different stages of this pandemic, in some cases, nations who are further along than Canada. As the global co-ordinating body, I would like to probe the experiences of these nations to help guide our actions.

Kelly McParland: The WHO, and Dr. Aylward, owe Canadians honest answers

Kelly McParland: The WHO, and Dr. Aylward, owe Canadians honest answers

This being Canada, the members of the committee seeking to pose questions to Aylward have been both polite and patient. He was supposed to testify early in April but cancelled on short notice. Members of the committee then sent off a second invitation, only to be told by a lawyer for the WHO that he wouldn’t show. Committee members were told they could submit written questions, which the organization would, presumably, answer as it saw fit. That was a bit much even for courteous Canadians, so, last week, in a third try, the committee took the rare step of voting to issue a summons for Aylward to appear, if and when he steps foot on Canadian soil. The vote was unanimous.

“Canada is a member of the WHO and I think the WHO ought to operate with accountability and transparency to its members,” said New Democratic Party health critic Don Davies, reasonably enough.